Describe Since Fences, like many of August Wilson’s plays, explores the evolving African American experience, we cannot view the play without including the setting, 1950s American culture.

Since Fences, like many of August Wilson’s plays, explores the evolving African American experience, we cannot view the play without including the setting, 1950s American culture. The characters’ backstories, personalities, and motivations are conveyed through the dialogue and action but much remains unsaid and left to audience members’ speculation.In this discussion assignment, you will submit a thesis statement related to a theme from Unit 1 and support this thesis with evidence using one or more quotes from the play.As an example: a student might focus on how the character of Rose plays the role of wife and mother and how these roles represent the theme of love (romantic/filial). Although these roles represent the limited choices for women in 1950s American culture, one could discuss scenes where Rose’s character steps out of the boundaries of these limitations due to filial or romantic love. One appropriate thesis statement for this particular topic would be something similar to the following:Although the character of Rose seems limited to performing the dutiful role of wife and mother in August Wilson’s Fences, the love for her family challenges Rose to step beyond the boundaries of a housewife living in 1950s American culture.Then, the student could include scenes (include quotes from the play) where Rose uses her intelligence and skills to navigate the challenges she faces as a wife and mother in 1950s American culture.Note: This thesis is provided as an example. Do not use it for your own paper; use your own excellent ideas!In two paragraphs, discuss why and how your thesis statement (claim or argument) connects with one or two of the themes discussed in Unit 1:Love (filial, romantic, or platonic)Alienation/OthernessThe American Dream/NightmareThe Quest for Identity/Coming of AgeConformity/RebellionUse specific details from the text to support your point, including at least one direct quote. Consider this discussion as preparation for your essay in this Unit.Respond to at least 2 other students’ posts. Your initial post and peer responses should be substantive (one to two paragraphs).Criteria on which you will be graded:Your thesis statement “makes a claim that others might dispute” (The UNC Writing Center: Thesis Statements – http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/thesis-statements/Your choice of theme or themes is well-supported by your textual examples.Your explanation and engagement of your chosen quotations.Your responses to your classmates are respectful, thoughtful, and original (i.e., not merely “good job!”)Respond to the two users below::Kaori Mcgil>>>Despite being trapped in the role as Troy’s son in August Wilson’s Fences, Cory eventually has to overcome his irresponsible and immature nature in order to become the man the fear of his father kept him from becoming. This comes from the fact that in the beginning of the play Cory was shown as immature. Caring primarily about his passion for football and putting all of his other responsibilities to the side. Cory went as far as lying to his father in an attempt to still be able to pursue his dream of playing sports despite being African American. After Troy makes it to where Cory can no longer pursue this dream, Cory’s character slowly begins to shift. Throughout the play, August Wilson also shows the fear Cory has towards his father through his actions. However, this changes as Troy puts his hand roughly on Rose forcing Cory to intervene, Wilson writes, “Cory comes up behind Troy and grabs him…Cory throws a glancing blow that catches him on the chest and knocks him down. Troy is stunned, as is Cory,” (August Wilson pp. 75). This moment is the beginning of Cory’s character development and it is shown by Wilson pointing out how surprised Cory was about him standing up to his father in order to protect his mother. Cory’s development continued several months after that incident when he stands up to his father acknowledging the fact that due to Troy’s actions, Cory had to be the man of the house not just an immature child. “You ain’t never gave me nothing! You ain’t never done nothing but hold me back. Afraid I was gonna be better than you. All you ever did was try and make me scared of you. I used to tremble every time you called my name. Every time I heard your footsteps in the house. Wondering all the time . . . what’s Papa gonna say if I do this? …. And Mama, too . . . she tries . . . but she’s scared of you,” (August Wilson pp. 89-90). By acknowledging the fact that his father’s actions were wrong, it allows Cory to no longer have to follow the cycle that his father and his late grandfather forced their families to do this. It is also after this scene that Cory joins the Marines in order to further break the cycle of enabling bad behavior. The final moment of Cory’s character development is when he decides to push past his emotions and go to his father’s funeral, because without the hardship his father put him through he wouldn’t have been able to break the cycle and fully grow as a man.Zatoria Bines>>>Although Cory’s main role is being a son, he also strives to reach his own goals which can lead to the American Dream.One of the main characters in Fences is Rose and Troy’s son Cory. Cory’s ultimate goal in life is to become a football player. He informs his mother and father about a game he would be playing in. His father Troy does not approve of his decision to play. Troy doesn’t feel like he will get far in reaching his goals due to the social dynamics of the time period they are in. It is a constant reminder of how Troy had dreams and goals that he did not reach growing up. His father makes the decision to prevent Cory’s goal from happening. He unknowingly reaches out to his coach and tells him that he won’t be playing in an important game. Cory tells Rose, “Papa done went up to the school and told Coach Zellman I can’t play football no more. This was my last game. Told him to tell the recruiter not to come. (Act 1,Scene 4, p.53)” The recruiter could possibly change his life drastically. His father’s actions would only cause resentment towards him in the long run.Wilson, August. “Fences.” Login – Georgia Online Virtual Instruction Enterprise Wide, go.view.usg.edu/d2l/le/content/2015559/viewContent/33404763/View.